Guide :

Change to a more aggressive chemo for neoadjuvant approach

Hi, My wife (35yo) was  just diagnosed with Stage IIIb breast cancer about 4 weeks ago. Since the tumor is big, the onco advised a Neoadjuvant approach (chemo-surgey-chemo). My wife started chemo yesterday however I am concerned as the Onco gave her FAC regimen (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphomide). I'm not sure if ths is aggressive enough compared to a Taxotere-based regimen like TAC. I just read today that TAC is clearly superior to FAC in neoadjuvant situations. I'm really worried as I feel this is a critical phase of the treatment. Is it an option to ch

Research, Knowledge and Information :


Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Operable Breast Cancer


the neoadjuvant approach to treat early ... of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer began in ... [11,12]; in others, this approach was offered more
Read More At : www.cancernetwork.com...

Node-Positive Breast Ca: Door Opens to SLN After Neoadjuvant ...


Node-Positive Breast Ca: Door Opens to SLN ... the neoadjuvant approach to treatment of ... more patients will be able to forego more aggressive axillary ...
Read More At : www.medpagetoday.com...

For Aggressive Breast Cancer, Chemo May Work Better in the ...


Younger women with aggressive breast cancers often benefit more than ... who underwent "neoadjuvant" chemotherapy -- chemo given before ... change treatment protocol ...
Read More At : www.medicinenet.com...

Residual Disease After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast ...


... Residual Disease After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast ... tumors that may predict greater response to neoadjuvant chemo ... A more aggressive approach.
Read More At : www.researchgate.net...

Breast Cancer Patients Who Receive Neoadjuvant Therapy ...


Breast Cancer Patients Who Receive Neoadjuvant Therapy Followed by ... radiation was administered to 253 due to more aggressive ... a change of color or ...
Read More At : www.musclemagfitness.com...

Is Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Ovarian ... - Cancer Network


Surgical debulking of epithelial ovarian carcinoma has been a mainstay of therapy for more than 50 years—since the approach was first advocated by Meigs in 1934.[1]
Read More At : www.cancernetwork.com...

Breast Cancer Topic: neoadjuvant before surgery


Topic: neoadjuvant before surgery Forum ... TNBC is a very aggressive cancer. Having neoadjuvant chemo is a great way to ... means it grows more quickly. Neoadjuvant ...
Read More At : community.breastcancer.org...

Neoadjuvant Therapy in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer


Transcript: Johanna Bendell, MD: I find it’s very institution-dependent. There seem to be institutions that are believers in the neoadjuvant approach, even in a ...
Read More At : www.onclive.com...

Chemotherapy may spread cancer and trigger more aggressive ...


... is offered to younger patients with more aggressive tumors. If the chemo makes it more ... neoadjuvant treatment (though this may change) ... approach until it's ...
Read More At : www.reddit.com...

Suggested Questions And Answer :


Change to a more aggressive chemo for neoadjuvant approach

I am sorry to hear that yoiur wife has been dx with Stage lllB BC. However, questions in this forum are answered by survivors and other volunteers generally not identified as medical professionals. We are unable, therefore, to provide an expert medical opinion regarding the specifics of your wife's treatment as you requested. It would be best for you and your wife to discuss these questions with her oncologist, but if you don't feel comfortable doing that, she seek a second-opinion consultation with another oncologist. Best wishes to both you and your wife...
Read More At : ...

Change breast cancer treatment plan after chemo

This would be an issue to be decided with the guidance of your Oncologist .... In some circumstances I suppose that a finding could be left "as is" following Chemo but I would never agree to that; just because a lump is not detectable it doesn't mean that cancer cells could not be present in the area or the surrounding tissue. To my way of thinking it would be too much of a risk.  Regards ....
Read More At : ...

chemo for a 2nd time

The desicion to repeat Chemotherapy would be dependant upon the Pathology report on this latest specimen removed. You might ask the Oncologist; or rather have your Sister ask about the report and the necessity for Chemotherapy.  I'm sure the first opinion may have been before the final Pathology report.  If the cancer is indeed an aggressive type then the need for Chemo would be obvious.    Regards .....
Read More At : ...

Triple Negative Treatment Options

Hi, You are correct, there is no specific therapy for triple negative disease. Some of the research that is ongoing involves some similarities with triple negatives and BrCA-1 (a genetic predisposition to breast cancer). There is an investigational agent called PARP-1 inhibitors currently being evaluated in BrCA and may present an option also for 3-negatives. Another finding is that there seems to be an overexpression of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor - a structure on the tumor that normally requires signals to promote growth, but in cancer may be perpetually in an active growth promotion configuration), and there are several drugs that may target this: gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, panitumumab. Another target worth pursuing is the tumor blood vessels there are drugs with this mechanism being targeted. There are still other drugs like mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors out there. Some of these are in the stages where activity is still being measured so any broad recommendations cannot be made (but hey, we're only brainstorming afterall). On the practical side however, the best way to get additional treatment is in enrollment in a clinical trial. Discuss with your doctor if there is an ongoing trial in his/her insitution or if there are any nearby institutions where you can be enrolled. I don't know if it means anything to you, but your participation will help patients in the future in the same way that the research on patients who participated years ago have defined the treatment you already have received. Stay positive.
Read More At : ...

delay in chemo - how long is ok?

Hi, I really don't know about the time frame for delaying Chemotherapy..Statistics are frequently contradictory and you can't take them at face value and apply them to your own specific case.I have read that some women,for whatever reason,had to delay chemo for up to 8 weeks and others 85 days after surgery.But as you know each case is different and only your Oncologist can give you the best possible information about this. I really hope that your breast infection will be gone very soon so you can start the therapy. I wish you health and  success with your treatments.
Read More At : ...

reexcision, mastectomy or neither?

Hi, The margins after the treatment are suboptimal, making recurrence at the site as well risk for distant metastasis very high.  The current lumpectomy would fail to achieve cure and hence a re-excision or a mastectomy would be recommended. If the tumor size you wrote as 6.2 is in cm not in mm, it may be better to do the mastectomy as this would be harder to radiate afterwards. Other factors to look at would be the size of the remaining breast if the breast conservation is feasible. There are different techniques for reconstruction and rehabilitation that may be available to you - they would of course be based on what surgery to perform.  
Read More At : ...

Need advice for friend on aggressive chemo, no appetite not wanting to drink fluids.

I'm sorry that no one has answered your question yet.  I don't usually frequent this forum, but since I've been through chemotherapy myself, I occasionally stop by. What do you look for before taking her to the hospital?  The main thing is to watch for fevers (anything over 101*).  This is a sign of infection, which isn't a good thing to have, especially when you hardly have an immune system left.   Two drugs that I took for nausea are Emend and Zofran.  I think overall they did a pretty good job, but I think there are other drugs available if those don't work.   I was told to eat a high calorie, high protein diet while on chemo.  The extra calories because doctors know that the appetite is usually diminished.  The extra protein because this is the main building block for rebuilding stem cells in the bone marrow.  Chemotherapy has wiped out most of those stem cells and her body needs to make more.  There will probably be certain foods she can't stand (even the smells can make one feel sick).   Eating small meals more often sometimes helps.  Also, many patients turn to nutritional protein shakes when they struggle to get adequate nutrition. Hopefully this information will be able to still help you, but if not maybe other caregivers will find value in it.  
Read More At : ...

neoadjuvant chemotherapy

Hi there. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy aims to shrink the tumor and any of the accompanying small nodules so that breast conservation surgery can be easily accomplished and also that safe margins around the tumor during the surgery can be met.  Our bone marrow recovers after 2-3 weeks of chemotherapy and this should not and would not affect the surgery.  Tags/markers are placed around the tumor area so that the surgeon would know where to resect the tumor in case the tumor completely disappears during chemotherapy (so called "complete response").  Neoadjuvant chemotherapy sounds like a good plan for your sister.   Regards and God bless...
Read More At : ...

Concerns about recent Pap

Hi! Yes, BRCA1+ status can increase the risk of peritoneal cancer, including vaginal and cervical cancer. You must have the PAP screen every year until three consecutive PAP smears show no further progression. However, in a high risk case as yours, some doctors may prefer a biopsy or coposcopy to rule out cancer progression. So, please discuss with your oncologist. Take care! The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history. Hence this reply to your post should only be considered as a guiding line and you must consult your doctor at the earliest for your medical problem.
Read More At : ...

Tips for a great answer:

- Provide details, support with references or personal experience .
- If you need clarification, ask it in the comment box .
- It's 100% free, no registration required.
next Question || Previos Question
  • Start your question with What, Why, How, When, etc. and end with a "?"
  • Be clear and specific
  • Use proper spelling and grammar
all rights reserved to the respective owners || www.online-medical-clinic.com || Terms of Use || Contact || Privacy Policy
Load time: 0.1409 seconds