Guide :

Stage IV vs Stage IIIC

what is the difference between these 2 stages?  I was originally stage IIB in 1999....now I have supraclavical node involvement.  Some boards group this as Stage IIIC.  Alot has changed in 11 years...can you explain the difference to me?  Thanks!

Research, Knowledge and Information :


Stage IIIC | Melanoma Research Foundation


Anybody have information on how often stage IIIC ... They are saying that they are trying to find a cure for melanoma before it progresses to stage 4 so your ...
Read More At : www.melanoma.org...

Stages of Breast Cancer | Breastcancer.org


Multiple stages of breast cancer ... Stage IIIC describes invasive breast ... Stage IV describes invasive breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast and ...
Read More At : www.breastcancer.org...

How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged?


Aug 04, 2014 · Stage IIIC (T3c, N0 or N1, M0): ... Stage IV (any T, any N, M1) This is the most advanced stage of ovarian cancer. In this stage the cancer has spread to ...
Read More At : www.cancer.org...

Better survival with primary surgery in stage IIIC ovarian ca ...


Key clinical point: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with lower overall survival of stage IIIC but not stage IV ovarian cancer. Major finding: Median OS was 33 ...
Read More At : www.mdedge.com...

Radical surgery versus standard surgery for primary ...


Radical surgery versus standard surgery for primary cytoreduction of bulky stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer: an observational study
Read More At : bmccancer.biomedcentral.com...

Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version - National ...


In stage IIIC: Cancer has spread through the serosa ... Stage IV and Recurrent Colon Cancer. Treatment of stage IV and recurrent colon cancer may include the following:
Read More At : www.cancer.gov...

Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy vs Surgery in Epithelial Ovarian ...


Journals JAMA JAMA Cardiology ... serous histologic subtype, and stage IV vs IIIC disease (eTable 2 in the Supplement). After stratification by stage, associations ...
Read More At : jamanetwork.com...

Cancer staging - Wikipedia


Example: cT3 cN1 pM1 clinical Stage IV and cT3 cN1 pM1 pathological Stage IV. ... AJCC 3 rd Ed Cancer Staging Manual 4: 1992: 1993: AJCC 4 th Edition Cancer Staging ...
Read More At : en.wikipedia.org...

Two Different Schedules of Carboplatin, Paclitaxel ...


Two Different Schedules of Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Gemcitabine, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IIIC or Stage IV Primary Epithelial ...
Read More At : clinicaltrials.gov...

Suggested Questions And Answer :


Stage IV vs Stage IIIC

This is a bit wordy but this is what they are going by.... Cancer stage is based on the size of the tumor, whether the cancer is invasive or non-invasive, whether lymph nodes are involved, and whether the cancer has spread beyond the breast. The purpose of the staging system is to help organize the different factors and some of the personality features of the cancer into categories, in order to: best understand your prognosis (the most likely outcome of the disease) guide treatment decisions (together with other parts of your pathology report), since clinical studies of breast cancer treatments that you and your doctor will consider are partly organized by the staging system provide a common way to describe the extent of breast cancer for doctors and nurses all over the world, so that results of your treatment can be compared and understood Stage 0 Stage 0 is used to describe non-invasive breast cancers, such as DCIS and LCIS. In stage 0, there is no evidence of cancer cells or non-cancerous abnormal cells breaking out of the part of the breast in which they started, or of getting through to or invading neighboring normal tissue. Stage I Stage I describes invasive breast cancer (cancer cells are breaking through to or invading neighboring normal tissue) in which: the tumor measures up to 2 centimeters, AND no lymph nodes are involved Stage II Stage II is divided into subcategories known as IIA and IIB. Stage IIA describes invasive breast cancer in which: no tumor can be found in the breast, but cancer cells are found in the axillary lymph nodes (the lymph nodes under the arm), OR the tumor measures 2 centimeters or less and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, OR the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters and has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes Stage IIB describes invasive breast cancer in which: the tumor is larger than 2 but no larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, OR the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes Stage III Stage III is divided into subcategories known as IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC. Stage IIIA describes invasive breast cancer in which either: no tumor is found in the breast. Cancer is found in axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone, OR the tumor is 5 centimeters or smaller and has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, OR the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures Stage IIIB describes invasive breast cancer in which: the tumor may be any size and has spread to the chest wall and/or skin of the breast AND may have spread to axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone Inflammatory breast cancer is considered at least stage IIIB. Stage IIIC describes invasive breast cancer in which: there may be no sign of cancer in the breast or, if there is a tumor, it may be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast, AND the cancer has spread to lymph nodes above or below the collarbone, AND the cancer may have spread to axillary lymph nodes or to lymph nodes near the breastbone Stage IV Stage IV describes invasive breast cancer in which: the cancer has spread to other organs of the body -- usually the lungs, liver, bone, or brain "Metastatic at presentation" means that the breast cancer has spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes, even though this is the first diagnosis of breast cancer. The reason for this is that the primary breast cancer was not found when it was only inside the breast. Metastatic cancer is considered stage IV. Additional staging information You may also hear terms such as "early" or "earlier" stage, "later," or "advanced" stage breast cancer. Although these terms are not medically precise (they may be used differently by different doctors), here is a general idea of how they apply to the official staging system: Early stage Stage 0 Stage I Stage II Some stage III Later or advanced stage Other stage III Stage IV Doctors use a staging system to determine how far a cancer has spread. The most common system is the TNM staging system. You may hear the cancer described by three characteristics: size (T stands for tumor) lymph node involvement (N stands for node) whether it has metastasized (M stands for metastasis) The T (size) category describes the original (primary) tumor: TX means the tumor can't be measured or found. T0 means there isn't any evidence of the primary tumor. Tis means the cancer is "in situ" (the tumor has not started growing into the breast tissue). The numbers T1-T4 describe the size and/or how much the cancer has grown into the breast tissue. The higher the T number, the larger the tumor and/or the more it may have grown into the breast tissue. The N (node involvement) category describes whether or not the cancer has reached nearby lymph nodes: NX means the nearby lymph nodes can't be measured or found. N0 means nearby lymph nodes do not contain cancer. The numbers N1-N3 describe the size, location, and/or the number of lymph nodes involved. The higher the N number, the more the lymph nodes are involved. The M (metastasis) category tells whether there are distant metastases (whether the cancer has spread to other parts of body): MX means metastasis can't be measured or found. M0 means there are no distant metastases. M1 means that distant metastases were found. Once the pathologist knows your T, N, and M characteristics, they are combined in a process called stage grouping, and an overall stage is assigned. For example, a T1, N0, M0 breast cancer would mean that the primary breast tumor: is less than 2 centimeters across (T1) does not have lymph node involvement (N0) has not spread to distant parts of the body (M0) This cancer would be grouped as a stage I cancer. Best wishes.
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prognosis

Hi there. The issue regarding anti-oxidant supplements and chemotherapy is still controversial.  Some say that these anti oxidants can lessen the effect of chemotherapy drugs and therefore decrease the over all benefit.  However, this effect is still not proven by full proof data.  For some doctors, they prescribed these antioxidants to increase the resistance of the patient and therefore tolerate the chemotherapy treatment.  All in all, this is still controversial and I believe there is presently no harm of taking these supplements alongside chemotherapy.  Stage IIIC breast cancer has about 50-60% chance of survival in 10 years, and can be increased by about 10-15% with the addition of chemotherapy. REgards.
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Caregiver from 1,000 miles away--Anyone else? Advice?

Hi Pleiad007, My heart goes out to you!!! How very, very sad. Please except my apology for my tardy response. There ARE others in your situation or a similar situation. I must be off today as my computer is having some problems and must be repaired.  There is a post from the man that is caring for his parents over long distance on the Senior Health Forum. I will try to connect the two of you when I return tomorrow or maybe you can look too. But caregiving is caregiving. Each situation may NOT have the exact same facts but it is all very similar.  Caregiving can be and often is Heart Wrenching but from experience I can say it also has it Rewards. You may not see it that way now but I promise you that in time you will. It sounds to me like you are being a wonderful support. Your 3-way conversations, phone calls and all are priceless. As time goes on IF this becomes a terminal process there will be Hospice that you can work with long distance. Your support right now is so very important.....however you can give it. When my father was terminal my sister called me everyday for many months. She lives over 600 miles from us. I was the Caregiver and she my family support. I cannot tell you what those calls meant to me. It was like she was right beside me and I am sure your sister feels the same way. I could feel my sister's love and hugs come across the phone and into my home. So don't sell your support short. It means very very much to her. I understand how challenging your Bipolar II Disorder can be, especially as it may relate to this situation. But you'll do better than you think. Some where we find the strength to help those that we love regardless of your personal challenges ....and you will also. You will not fail your sister.   Of course you love your sister....and the fear of losing her can be paralyzing. We'll help you deal with that but grief and loss is an individual and often lonely process.  No one knows exactly your grief but those of us that have been their have a very good idea. I have an appointment to have this computer repaired this morning. So I won't be back till tomorrow. But I will chat more with you than. I sure hope you are still monitoring this post. We also have an excellent Ovarian Cancer Support Community on MedHelp. You can find it under our Forums listing. If you can't find it I will provide you with a link when I return. Again I hope you are still "here" with us. I will be back either later this evening or tomorrow. You'll be in my thoughts and prayers. My Best to You, ~Tuck
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Suggestions or Recommendations, Please

Hi.  I am not from the USA, so I cannot give you recommendations about specific cancer centers.  What I can tell you is that your friend has an additional option - intravenous bisphosphonates such as Zometa - which can be given to control the bone pain, reduce the extent of the bone metastases, and repair damaged bone.  Bisphosphonate treatment can be given initially, and when the pain has been controlled, she can then make that trip to Mayo Clinic more comfortably and safely.
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Peripheral neuropathy following paclitaxel

My abraxane treatments did something similar for what seemed the longest time. It think that the prickling sensation is the nerves trying to recover from the medicine.   Talk with her doc, when you can, but that sensation should alleviate over time...how long is anyone guess I think.  Somedays I still get weird sensations on my arm on the mastectomy side, more from the damage of the surgery than the medicine, I think. Congrats to your mom for making it through...now comes the "fixing" of the body .... regrowing hair and nerve endings ...getting back to normal.... all of that becomes its own "weirdness"...and the identity change from cancer patient to cancer survivor....it's very huge, in my opinion.
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Connection between breast cancer and numbness in hand???

Hi, I understand your concern regarding this symptom, and numbness may indeed neurological in nature. This may be attributed to existing nerve issues such as carpal tunnel as you mentioned or resulting to possible nerve injury after the  operation. If it persists, it is best that you have this checked by your doctor or be referred to a neurologist for proper evaluation. Take care and do keep us posted.
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Chemo side effects

Hi. Side effects of chemotherapy can manifest several days after chemotherapy.  These should be managed with supportive measures like giving appetite stimulants, or food supplements.  These side effects usually resolve after 2-3 weeks.  If severe, patients are advised hospital admission for management. How would you characterize the voice change? Since she is diabetic, it is very important to have her glucose monitored regularly.  You mentioned that lately, she has poor appetite.  That might bring her glucose level down resulting in hypoglycemia. It would be best to bring her back to her oncologist for further evaluation and management. Good luck.
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